Anita Rodriquez’s Authentic Mexican Recipes: Part Two


Alberto’s Quesadillas with Molcajete Sauce (or Quesadillas con salsa de molcajete)

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At my friend Alberto’s house in Parral, Mexico, over quesadillas con salsa de molcajete, I was regaled with stories about curanderos, prophecies, and strange phenomena, rich with the flavor of Mexican mysticism.

Ingredients

  • 4 jitomates or roma tomatoes
  • 2 jalapeño peppers, stem and seeds removed, finely minced
  • 4 garlic cloves, unpeeled
  • 1/4 cup minced onion
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/3 cup minced fresh cilantro
  • juice of 1 lime
  • 4 wheat tortillas, or 8 corn tortillas
  • ½ cup grated cheese of choice

Directions

  1. For the molcajete sauce Alberto put the jitomates, garlic cloves, and jalapeños, skin side up, under the broiler in a pan or cookie sheet until the chiles were thoroughly blistered and soft, about 15 minutes. Then he peeled the tomatoes and garlic and put them into a big molcajete along with the unpeeled jalapeños, minced onion, salt, and cilantro. He ground them into a very coarse paste, adding lime juice as he went along. Then he filled each tortilla with a dollop of sauce, folded it, and sprinkled grated cheese on top. He baked them in a hot oven for about 20 minutes and served them hot.

Rellenos Poblano with Shrimp

Ingredients

  • 8 poblano chiles
  • 1 cup canned shrimp, drained, or 1 cup cooked fresh shrimp, diced
  • 1 cup grated manchego cheese (but you can use any cheese)
  • 1 onion, finely diced
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled and pressed
  • ½ cup thick cream, room temperature (optional)

Directions

  1. Put chiles in broiler, turning as needed so each side is blistered. Skin them, split open carefully without tearing the meat, and remove the seeds. Combine the other ingredients in a bowl to make a filling and stuff the peppers with it. Bake in a greased baking dish at 450 degrees, or until cheese is melted. Pour very thick room-temperature cream over each relleno just before serving.

Last week we shared HipLatina’s conversation with Anita Rodríguez. This week the artist has generously agreed to share some of the food from her narrative. Here are a few authentic Mexican recipes from her book Coyota in the Kitchen: A Memoir of New and Old Mexico. Qué suerte!

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