Cardi B Invited Vogue to Her Abuela’s Bronx Home


Cardi B is known for keeping it real and so it really should come as no surprise that unlike other celebs who flaunt their mansions, she invited Vogue’s 73 Questions to her grandma’s house in the Bronx. The space is where she gets away from “the chaos of life and work,” Cardi shared as she’s holding onto a sleeping Kulture, saying the place is “always packed with family.”

Cardi has been open about not having a nanny for Kulture so her guest appearance makes sense and, according to Cardi, she’s the reason behind her hustle. “In order for me to spoil my child for the rest of my life, I have to have money and make money for the rest of my life.” The 27-year-old Grammy winner says one of the things she’s learned through motherhood is how you’re never on time and she wants Kulture to learn that it doesn’t matter what people say and to dream big.

In an industry that she thinks needs more “realness,” Cardi followed her own advice opening up about family, her career, politics, and how Beyoncé inspired her to cope with criticism while taking care of her sleepy baby girl.

Her husband, Offset, who also appears in the video via FaceTime, said that one of his wife’s best attributes is how she is raising their daughter. At one point the interviewer asks Cardi if she notices a double standard between how male and female rappers are interviewed  and she says that females are asked about other artists and the press tries to instigate drama. But we couldn’t help but notice the Vogue interviewer asked a lot of motherhood related questions that a male rapper wouldn’t have received.

Offset and Cardi married in September 2017 and they broke up Dec. 2018  before reuniting earlier this year, when asked for relationship advice she said. “If you love somebody no matter what, try to work it out.” She shared that dealing with the criticism she gets on a daily basis is hard but she heard Beyoncé only gives herself a day to feel bad for herself and then she’s back to work  “cause I don’t give a f*ck.”

She also shared her fashion icons (Rihanna, J.Lo, Lady Gaga, and Missy Elliot) and that she grew up listening to Missy Elliot, 50 Cent, Ja Rule and she performed Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance” at a high school talent show. Even though she is now a musical icon herself, she admits she still gets star-struck meeting celebs.

She talked new music describing her upcoming album as “spicy” and “controversial” and embraced the labels the interviewer said were commonly associated with her including “female empowerment,” “disruptor” and “no filter.” But when asked to describe herself she said, “I have a really chill side. I’m very balanced. I can be a little crazy. But if I don’t know you, I’m going to study you. I’m a big Libra. I’m always to myself,” she said. “I’m kind of boring.”

In true Cardi fashion, the 15-minute interview gets explicit when discussing her relationship with Offset and her guilty pleasure is TMI but she also discusses serious issues when it comes to politics. She joined forces with Bernie Sanders in the past and says he’s clearly into helping people not just for getting the presidential vote. When asked what she would say to Trump — whom she refers to as “the one that’s going to get impeached” —  she responds with “If you don’t love every American citizen, why did you become president?”

“Living in my neighborhood made me want to speak up always. Seeing the injustice, seeing how kids my age, my color, darker were getting treated in my neighborhood. That always made me want to be involved, even when I was a teenager,” she said. She goes on to say that she realized “the system was never made for us” and that she would create a law that would put racists in jail or have them fined.

Cardi — who was raised in the Bronx — is the ninth highest-certified female artist and the highest-certified female rapper and has three No.1 singles including her megahit “Bodak Yellow.” She recently appeared in J.Lo’s Hustlers and next up is an appearance on Fast & Furious 9, coming out  May 22, 2020.  When asked how she wants to be remembered, the former stripper and reality start turned iconic rapper said “as the girl-next-door who made it.”

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