In Oprah Interview, Salma Hayek Shares Shocking Details About Harvey Weinstein


Oprah Winfrey has a way of feeling like your best friend. She has a knack for interviewing and people naturally disclose things to her whether they intended to or not. Case in point: On Feb. 8, during a live taping of Oprah’s “SuperSoul Conversations” at the Apollo in New York City, Salma shared more details about Harvey Weinstein that she hadn’t disclosed in her powerful New York Times op-ed titled “Harvey Weinstein Is My Monster Too.”

She first talked about she first hesitated about sharing her story, saying felt such shame.

“[The New York Times] contacted me to be a part of the first story and already by this contact, there was all this turmoil and I started crying when they asked and I ended up not doing it,” Salma told Oprah. “And then I felt ashamed that I was a coward. I was supporting women for two decades but I couldn’t do this… I thought of my daughter… I thought of the shame,” adding that:

“When the information about Harvey came out, I was ashamed I didn’t say anything,” Salma told Oprah. “But I felt like my pain was so small compared to all the other stories.”

Salma says it took her two months to finally feel the strength to come forward to out Harvey and the horrific way he treated her.

During the intense conversation between these two incredible women, Salma went further to disclose details about Harvey including threats he made against her.

He said a lot of things to me over those five years. He told me, ‘I am going to kill you.’ He also said to Julie Taymor [Frida director], and I didn’t write this in the article, he said, ‘I am going to break the kneecaps of that…the C-word.'”

The actress and activist went on to say that one of the reasons she was able to deal with Harvey is because she has dealt with sexual harassment since she was a little girl.

That’s why I could handle him better. I was very strong in front of him and I was smart, I sneaked my way out — maybe that’s why I didn’t get raped,” she said. “I’ve had this problem since I was little.” She later added: “I am a short, Mexican-Arab, angry woman… but I don’t let that anger blur my vision. I can use that energy to be productive.”

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